I read about police abuses almost every day now.

The latest SWAT Team outrage involved holding small children at gunpoint during a home invasion — all in retaliation over their father having quarreled with a drunken off-duty cop at a veterans lodge.

The officers threw to the floor, kicked and handcuffed Georgeia, her stepfather and her adult son Billy. They also injured Mark’s shoulder and forced Billy to lie face down in broken glass, according to the complaint.

When Georgeia pleaded repeatedly that she had young children in the house, at least one officer allegedly stated, “You think you can get one of ours, and we won’t get one of yours?”

The family says the police proceeded to drag Georgeia’s 10-year-old son Trentino violently from the bathtub, injuring his ankles. They allegedly then made the boy stand naked at gunpoint next to his 4-year-old sister Briseis.

Other than citizens filing lawsuits, there is no accountability at all. Police will not be fired, SWAT Teams will not be disbanded, and nothing will change.

What I found even creepier was to read about was an unusual case in which an innocent man managed to save himself by having hidden video cameras in the business police had targeted. Luckily for him, the cameras caught the undercover agent planting crack cocaine, which led to the charges being dismissed.

Here’s the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=HewxquptWJ0

It also appears that racial profiling may have been involved:

Charlie writes, “There is a smoke shop in Scotia NY, owned by a young black man. There are many, many smoke shops in the capital region, but the rest are owned by white people. Undercover police decided to send an ‘undercover agent’ (an informant facing his own jail time) to investigate. Shortly after, the owner was charged with possession of crack cocaine. He was facing almost a decade in prison. Just one hitch though: the owner had video cameras set up in his shop. The videos captured the informant dropped a bag of crack on the counter; planting the drugs. The charges were dismissed, the informant has suddenly “disappeared” and the owner is now considering a law suit.”

I would love to hear the informant’s side of this story. If the cops put him up to planting the crack and he was already facing charges, little wonder he has “disappeared.” He is in a classic no-win, as the authorities now have every interest in making him the fall guy for their misconduct.

The problem is, how many people have cameras pointing in all directions to protect them against this sort of abuse? Absent such video evidence, the “evidence” speaks for itself and a conviction is all but assured. I can’t think of a more perfect illustration of what is wrong with laws criminalizing possession of things. Anyone can plant anything on anyone. How many people are serving hard time on the basis of planted evidence? There is no way to know. They are just screwed.

Not only do we live in a militarized police state, it is increasingly a lawless one. And why wouldn’t it be? When police can do anything they want, they become a law unto themselves.