With all the fuss over the Danish cartoons, it occurred to me that readers of this blog might want to see them. And thanks to Right on the Left Coast, you can! Here’s a web site which has all of them.
By American standards, they’re quite mild.
Here’s an example:

Muhammed_Jens_Julius_Hansen_Jyllands-Posten_Cartoons.jpeg

Hmmm….
I’m already feeling guilty.
I’m thinking that maybe the title of this post is a bit harsh.
Tell you what; I’ll be sure to apologize as soon as that cartoon appears in the Philadelphia Inquirer!
UPDATE (1/31/06): While they don’t appear in hard copy, today’s Inquirer is directing readers interested in seeing the cartoons to this link.
Frankly, I’m stunned. Tongue-tied! Speechless!
But since the Inky has linked to the cartoons, I’m linking b-b-b-back in the most apologetic manner p-p-p-possible . . .
PorkyAllah.jpg

MORE: In an unrelated matter, AOL is being accused of “blasphemy” for using the expression “I AM.”
Are you concerned?
Am I serious?
(Am I allowed to say “I AM”?)
MORE: Here’s the image of the, er, blasphemy in question:
IAMscreenshot.jpg

Isn’t it obvious that the above was meant to offend God?
AND MORE: The Commissar is reprinting the cartoons, and urging all bloggers to do the same.
MORE: The debate is heating up, and Denmark has picked up a few allies:

Newspapers across Europe have reprinted caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad to show support for a Danish paper whose cartoons have sparked Muslim outrage.
Seven publications in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain all carried some of the drawings.
Their publication in Denmark led Arab nations to protest. Islamic tradition bans depictions of the Prophet.
The owner of one of the papers to reprint – France Soir – has now sacked its managing editor over the matter.
The cartoons have sparked diplomatic sanctions and death threats in some Arab nations, while media watchdogs have defended publication of the images in the name of press freedom.
Reporters Without Borders said the reaction in the Arab world “betrays a lack of understanding” of press freedom as “an essential accomplishment of democracy.”

Not everyone likes freedom or democracy. But not liking something doesn’t make it go away.
More here on growing European support for free speech. (Via InstaPundit.)
UPDATE: Postrel to Islam: grow up. (HT Justin.)
UPDATE (02/04/06): Notwithstanding claims about the MSM to the contrary, today’s Philadelphia Inquirer ran the following as hard copy:

InkMohamet2.jpg

INTERNATIONAL UPDATE: My apologies for any margin problems in the text which follows. I did the best I could with the html from the Support Denmark website.

العربية
بتاريخ 30 أيلول 2005 قامت صحيفة يولاندس بوستون الدنمركية بنشر 12 رسم كرتوني يصور النبي محمد. قام المسلمون بعاصفة من الاحتجاجات و اضر رسامان للاختباء بعد تلقيهما تهديدات بالقتل.
المنظمات الإسلامية طابت باعتذار رسمي من الحكومة الدنمركية و تحول الموضوع إلى أزمة دبلوماسية دولية
قامت منظمة المؤتمر الإسلامي ، المجلس الأوروبي، و منظمة الأمم المتحدة بانتقاد حكومة الدانمارك لعدم اتخاذها أية إجراءات ضد صحيفة يولاندس بوستون
رئيس الوزراء الدنمركي اندرياس فوج راسموسن دافع عن حرية الصحافة والتعبير وقال إن أية إجراءات مناسبة لا يمكن أن تتخذ من قبل الحكومة بل من قبل المحكمة
في هذه الأثناء يتم إحراق أعلام الدانمارك في بعض الدول الإسلامية ويتم إزالة المنتجات الدنمركية من على رفوف المتاجر . بضعة دول قامت بسحب سفرائها من الدانمارك و قام بعض الرجال المسلحين بمهاجمه مكتب الاتحاد الأوروبي في قطاع غزة.
الدانمارك تحتاج لدعمكم و مساندتكم، أظهر دعمك و اهتمامك وضع أحد هذه الوصلات على موقعك.

بتاريخ
30 أيلول
2005 قامت
صحيفة يولاندس
بوستون

الدنمركية بنشر
12
رسم
كرتوني

يصور النبي
محمد. قام
المسلمون بعاصفة
من الاحتجاجات
و اضر رسامان
للاختباء بعد
تلقيهما تهديدات
بالقتل.

المنظمات
الإسلامية طابت
باعتذار رسمي
من الحكومة
الدنمركية و
تحول الموضوع
إلى أزمة دبلوماسية
دولية

قامت
منظمة
المؤتمر الإسلامي
، المجلس
الأوروبي
،
و منظمة
الأمم المتحدة
بانتقاد
حكومة الدانمارك
لعدم اتخاذها
أية إجراءات
ضد صحيفة يولاندس
بوستون

رئيس
الوزراء الدنمركي
اندرياس
فوج راسموسن

دافع عن حرية
الصحافة والتعبير
وقال إن أية
إجراءات مناسبة
لا يمكن أن تتخذ
من قبل الحكومة
بل من قبل المحكمة

في هذه
الأثناء يتم
إحراق أعلام
الدانمارك
في بعض الدول
الإسلامية
ويتم إزالة
المنتجات الدنمركية
من على رفوف
المتاجر .
بضعة
دول قامت بسحب
سفرائها من
الدانمارك و
قام
بعض الرجال
المسلحين بمهاجمه
مكتب الاتحاد
الأوروبي في
قطاع غزة
.

الدانمارك
تحتاج لدعمكم
و مساندتكم،
أظهر دعمك و
اهتمامك وضع
أحد هذه الوصلات
على موقعك.

SupportDenmarkSmall1AR.png SupportDenmarkSmall2AR.png SupportDenmarkSmall3AR.png
MORE INTERNATIONAL NEWS: An Egyptian Newspaper published the cartoons in October with not a word of protest. (Via Pajamas Media and Solomonia.)

EgyptianCartoons.jpg

It’s tough not to conclude that the current event is largely manufactured outrage.
UPDATE: On Saturday, February 11, the Philadelphia Inquirer was picketed for reprinting the above cartoon, in a nonviolent protest by hundreds of local Muslims:

Hundreds of Muslims chanted and carried banners and signs outside the Inquirer-Daily News Building yesterday, protesting The Inquirer’s decision to reprint a caricature of the prophet Muhammad.
Many said they thought that the paper had defamed their religion by publishing an image that has angered Muslims across the world and resulted in mass protests and the burning of Western embassies. Many Muslims consider any depiction of Muhammad to be sacrilegious.
“We feel very strongly The Inquirer could have covered the news without printing this inflammatory cartoon,” said Zia Haq, 43, of Collegeville.
The cartoon, one of several originally published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in September, depicts Islam’s chief prophet with a lit bomb stuck in his turban. It ran in The Inquirer on Feb. 4 with a story about the dilemma faced by the media over reprinting the cartoon. The image was accompanied by a note, which said, in part, “The Inquirer intends no disrespect to the religious beliefs of any of its readers.”
Most U.S. newspapers have opted not to publish the images.
Inquirer editor Amanda Bennett, publisher Joe Natoli, and deputy managing editor Carl Lavin meandered through the crowd yesterday, introducing themselves and thanking people for coming. “I think this is really an opportunity to build some bridges,” Bennett said.
Bennett has said that the cartoon was reprinted to provide readers with “a perspective of what the controversy’s about.”

That’s the way to fight speech you don’t like.
With more speech, not less.
It’s a lesson in why speech needs to be kept free.
UPDATE: The Philadelphia Inquirer is running a poll asking the following question:

Do you think it was appropriate to publish one of the cartoons from the Danish newspaper?